MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18
MISHIMOTO MMAI-ACRD20-18

MMAI-ACRD20-18

Mishimoto® (18-22) Honda Accord 2.0T Cold Air Intake System with AirBox

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Compatible: (2.0L)

2018 - 2022 Honda Accord

  

 

Give your 2018+ Honda Accord 2.0T the attitude it deserves with the Mishimoto Performance Air Intake. Honda might have left behind the V6 with the 10th generation Accord, but in its place sits the detuned version of the Civic Type R’s powerplant. Where Honda designed the Accord to be a quiet and comfortable daily driver, some might want a little extra hiss and growl from their turbocharged Accord. Lucky for you, Mishimoto is here to deliver.

The Mishimoto Performance Air Intake for your 2.0T Accord alleviates the restrictions and mufflers put in place by Honda’s engineers, starting with our precision-adjusted MAF housing. CNC-machined from high-grade aluminum, our MAF housing in tandem with our silicone coupler creates a better flow for intake air while still maintaining safe air-fuel ratios. Our kit also features a Mishimoto high-flow oiled air filter incased in a robust rotational-molded airbox to keep out unwanted engine bay heat. Our airbox is topped with a sheet of carbon fiber to give a boost to your Accord’s engine bay aesthetic.

Coupled together, our improvements to the 2.0T’s intake system give the Accord a much-needed attitude adjustment. On top of the added aggressive engine tone, our intake improves flow by 50% as well as providing max power gains of 15.6 horsepower and 12.9 torque to the wheels. The Mishimoto 2018+ Honda Accord 2.0T Performance Air Intake also includes the Mishimoto Lifetime Warranty for a worry-free installation.

  • Direct fit for the 2018+ Honda Accord 2.0T
  • Provides max power gains of 15.6 whp and 12.9 wtq while maintaining safe A/F ratios
  • 50% increase in flow over stock system
  • No tune required
  • Precision-adjusted and CNC-machined MAF housing made of anodized aluminum for better flow through the system
  • Aggressive tone under acceleration
  • Robust rotational-molded airbox keeps unwanted hot air from entering air filter
  • Airbox features a carbon fiber lid for improved engine bay aesthetics
  • Mishimoto high-flow oiled air filter receives maximum airflow from the front of the vehicle
  • Mishimoto Lifetime Warranty

 

VEHICLE SPECS

ENGINE CODES K20C4
FITS 2018+ Honda Accord 2.0T


PRODUCT SPECS

OILED FILTER 38g of oil on filter
PIPE MATERIAL Silicone
MAX GAIN 15.6 whp
12.9 wtq
AIR FILTER PART NUMBER MMAF-3005S

 

PURCHASE INCLUDES

(1) Silicone Intake Elbow
(1) CNC Aluminum MAF Sensor Housing
(1) Rubber MAF housing gasket
(1) High-Flow, Oiled Filter
(1) Rotational-Molded Airbox
(4) Worm Gear Clamps
Mounting Hardware
Mishimoto Lifetime Warranty

 

DADITUDE – PERFORMANCE INTAKE R&D PART 2 – DESIGN PLANS

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Just like building up street cred can take some time, so does developing a performance intake. Luckily though, we have a plan in place to break the 2.0T Accord out of its shell. Before we can dive into what our new intake is going to look like under the hood, let’s take a look at the master plan.

Big MAF in Charge
This sensor is more or less in control of your engine's fuel mixture and controls whether you get a visit from the infamous check engine light.
This sensor is more or less in control of your engine’s fuel mixture and controls whether you get a visit from the infamous check engine light. If this sensor looks familiar, that’s because it is. The same hardware is used in the Civic Si

One of the biggest challenges when creating a new intake kit for a modern vehicle is avoiding the dreaded check engine light. The main offender for setting off the yellow beacon is the long-term fuel trim, or LTFT, which is measured in a positive or negative percentage. This is a gauge on how rich or lean the engine is running calculated by the signals sent to the ECU from the mass airflow sensor, or MAF. This sensor is calibrated to operate within the specific confines of its housing. Any adjustments to the size of this housing could skyrocket the LTFT and set off that unwanted dash light.

The leaning tower of MAF housing above shows where the Accord's housing sits in reference to the rest of the sporty Honda lineup.
The leaning tower of MAF housing above shows where the Accord’s housing sits in reference to the rest of the sporty Honda lineup.

In the case of the 2.0T Accord, Honda used a combination of the Civic Si’s sensor with a housing that was sized somewhere between the sporty Civic and the CTR. With this in mind, our engineer, Ye, is planning on making only slight adjustments to the size of this housing for the sake of flow. Part of the plan is to test out a few different configurations to find the perfect mixture of flow through our new kit and acceptable fuel trim levels to go with it.

RotoBox

Protecting the filter from absorbing the ambient engine bay heat is always something that we have in mind during these projects. There are plenty of ways to do just that, but here at Mishimoto we prefer to give the filter a new shell with a fully enclosed box. The new box will keep the warmer air from seeping in and the fresh air focused and flowing where it needs to go.

Sheet metal has long since been our material of choice when it comes to enclosing the air box. It’s relatively inexpensive, which helps on your end, plus it’s durable and does the job. However, given the space constraints on the 2.0T flavored Accord, and the complexity of the design, even a cheaper metal might not be enough to limit the price tag. That being the case, we decided to venture down another path to create an airbox design that would be produced using rotational molding.

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Our engineer, Ye, started the box design by picking a filter size from our catalog already proven to improve the flow through the Accord’s respiratory system. From there, the box expanded to give some room for the fresh air to flow into while keeping it concentrated around the filter. With a keen eye on the surrounding equipment, Ye was able to design and create a tangible representation of the full design with the help of our 3D printers.

The plan for our new design is to improve on the power and sound of your turbo-Accord while keeping the sleek OEM+ styling. Our new design retains the factory snorkel and basically maxes out the build envelope for the new filter.
The plan for our new design is to improve on the power and sound of your turbo-Accord while keeping the sleek OEM+ styling. Our new design retains the factory snorkel and basically maxes out the build envelope for the new filter.
These grooves are more than just for looks. They're for added structural integrity. Our plan is for a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) construction. While this is regarded as a strong plastic material, Ye still wanted to make sure it could stand up to the rigors of the Accord’s engine bay. The eccentric design does just that.
These grooves are more than just for looks. They’re for added structural integrity. Our plan is for a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) construction. While this is regarded as a strong plastic material, Ye still wanted to make sure it could stand up to the rigors of the Accord’s engine bay. The eccentric design does just that.

With the obvious lack of space available in the engine bay of these new Accords, proper fitment is a cause for concern. Luckily though, in an effort to make sure that we get it right the first time around, we employed the 3D printers again to create a full fitment prototype for a first look at the new kit.

We also ditched the accordion-style section of hose for a silicone coupler. Our connection piece will feature multiple layers of durable silicone and remove the uneven surface, resulting in improved flow.
We also ditched the accordion-style section of hose for a silicone coupler. Our connection piece will feature multiple layers of durable silicone and remove the uneven surface, resulting in improved flow.
We fully intend on providing a lid with this intake kit, but you'll have to wait and see what it will be made of.
We fully intend on providing a lid with this intake kit, but you’ll have to wait and see what it will be made of.

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With our plan in place, the Accord 2.0T is well on its way toward the proper attitude adjustment. This might be a major milestone in the process, but there’s still a way to go. Make sure to stay tuned for the first look at the full production sample and testing.

 

DADITUDE – PERFORMANCE INTAKE R&D, PART 3 – PRODUCTION SAMPLE

The James Bond films would have likely ended up being a lot less thrilling without the dramatic use of all those gadgets thanks to Q. Since our fresh new 2.0T intake kit’s production sample just arrived, we’d like to assume the role of head gadgeteer in charge and take you on a tour of the updated system. In our last post, we were able to provide you with an in-depth preview of our intake kit design thanks to the magic of our 3D printers. This time, however, we can provide the real deal.

We start with the connecting point—the silicone coupler. Replacing the accordion-style stock coupler, this new connection piece sheds the uneven internal surface in favor of the uniformly slick qualities of silicone. We might not be replacing much on the cross-over pipe, but even improving this small section will yield positive gains in terms of airflow.

In the name of speed, we opted for raw MAF housings here at the R&D facility. These housings will be sporting a stealthy black anodized coating when it comes to the full production model. To find the correct balance between speed and stock tuning compatibility, Ye will be testing four different MAF sizes.

The MAF housing is the next piece in this puzzle. From the factory, the home for our 2.0T Accord’s MAF sensor was one with the airbox. In our design, the combination of these two components is more of a “just work friends” relationship. They might look good together, but our engineer, Ye, made sure that they were separated so they could grow independently of each other. We made some adjustments to the MAF housing design in the name of flow and power all the while keeping these changes to a minimum in order to ward off those pesky check engine lights.

In our last post, we showed you the 3D printed version of our design, but here’s the airbox as you’ll see it.

Now for the main event, our new airbox design. Typically, we would be looking at a robust production sample made from steel, but this time around we decided to go with a rotational molded design. We were able to give you a high-definition preview of the new design, but now we have the 4k quality airbox, as it will look from the mold. Let’s take a closer look.

The bottom resembles a shift pattern. Ye added this aspect to the design for structural integrity and to aid in draining if water finds its way in.
In addition to the strengthening designs, we plan on a thicker wall size for added toughness.
For some subtle flair, your filter will be protected by this sheet of real carbon fiber.

Unlike those classic Q scenes from the Bond films, our testing isn’t a scene of chaos during the demonstrations. Rather, we like to test our products one at a time on the dyno for the best results. Make sure you stay tuned to see how this sleeper cell performs with the help of some upgraded gadgets.


 

DADITUDE – PERFORMANCE AIR INTAKE R&D, PART 4 – DYNO RESULTS

In our last post we left you off with the fresh new production sample, ready to go through the ringer on the dyno. However, as we started testing, we found that there was still room to improve, specifically when it comes to the flow of our intake. The tight tolerances of our build envelope meant that our engineer was not seeing the desired results when the testing began, which is not a good look for a performance intake. Naturally, the next course of action was to cut a hole in the box, leaving us with a new window on the final design. Aside from the stylish new porthole, the opening meant a 50% increase in flow over the stock intake design.

Strapping our 2.0T Accord donor vehicle into the Dynapacks is where we see the fruits of our labor. We do monitor the fuel trims to ensure that our adjustments to the MAF housings don’t set off any check engine lights, and so far, so good. The next step is to gauge just how much of an attitude adjustment this intake kit adds to the Accord.

Once we started up the dyno testing, we were on our way to determining just how much attitude we were able to inject into the Accord. Through our series of power pulls on the Dynapack system, we recorded max power gains of 15.6 whp and 12.9 wtq all while maintaining a safe air to fuel ratio on the stock tuning. We expect even more power gains with aftermarket ECU maps or tunes in the mix.

They always say that it’s what’s on the inside that counts, and I supposed you could say that’s correct. However, it’s even better if what’s on the inside can live up to expectations of what’s on the outside. With the added power and less restricted turbo sounds, our intake will surely assist with bringing out the wild side of the domesticated K20 variant. Make sure you give your 10th generation Accord an attitude adjustment today.


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Engineering Report:

 

 

Warranty: